HCP #40: Navigating Relationship Transitions, with Rebecca Young Allen

Rebecca Young Allen is an ordained inter-faith clergy, a spiritual and emotional healer, a certified Focusing practitioner, and a nature lover, gardener, and homesteader. She talks with Eric about the challenges many people have with endings in relationships, trauma patterns, the poison of the good and bad duality, shadow work, the value of sometimes running towards the roar, and matrimorphy, among other things.

HCP #39: Healing Plants as a Radicalizing Force, with Jason Hirsch

Jason Hirsch is an anthropologist with a particular interest in Western herbalism and its relationships and tensions operating alongside mainstream medicine in North America. He talks with Eric about the impact that seeing ourselves as separate from nature has on health and healing, healing plants as a radicalizing force, and Western herbalism as an anti-capitalist institution, among other things.

HCP #38: On Local, Slow, and Deep Food, with Teresa Mares

Teresa Mares is a faculty member in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Vermont. Her teaching and research focus on food systems, and she has written widely on the topics of food justice and food sovereignty, among others. She talks with Eric about different ways of framing access to food, the different values intrinsic in food, drawbacks in how the local and organic food movements frame food access, and the realm of deep food, among other things.

HCP #37: Education, Unschooling, and Empathy, with Layla Abdel-Rahim

Layla Abdel-Rahim is an anthropologist and author. Her books Wild Children, Domesticated Dreamsand Children’s Literature, Domestication, and Social Foundationcritique the foundational social narratives that support a human-centered view of the natural world. She talks Eric talk about what attracted her to unschooling when her daughter was born, what unschooling means and how it worked for her, and how modern schooling diminishes people’s capacity for empathy, among other things.

HCP #35: Eating, Ethics, And Identity, with Charlotte Biltekoff

Charlotte Biltekoff is faculty at the University of California at Davis, where her research strives to build bridges between scientific and cultural approaches to questions about food and health. She is the author of the book Eating Right in America: The Cultural Politics of Food and Health, and her work is the subject of a short film called Imperfection Salad. She talks with Eric talk about the interplay between culture, politics and how we build our identities by moralizing our eating practices, and other things.

HCP #34: Anchoring our Sense of Place with Wild Foods, with Bronislaw Grala

Bronislaw Grala has spent much of his adult life learning the art of wildcrafting, and can frequently be found in the local forests and fields gathering food, medicine, and raw materials for his apothecary and kitchen. He talks with Eric about what attracted him to wildcrafting, how wildcrafting can anchor our sense of place, the risks associated with commercializing wild plants, and regulating the take of wild plants as public trusts much like states do wild game animals, among other things.

HCP #33: The Erosion of US Food Sovereignty, with Heather Retberg

Heather Retberg operates Quill’s End Farm with her husband in Penobscot, Maine. She advocates for local food sovereignty ordinances in her home state, and played a role in crafting the Maine Food Sovereignty Law that was passed in summer of 2017. She talks with Eric about what food sovereignty is, the links between food and water sovereignty, how large corporations gain control of resources in rural areas of the United States, and lessons she has learned in her years of food sovereignty activism, among other things.

HCP #30: Bearing Witness to the Great Unravelling, with Harlan Morehouse

Harlan Morehouse teaches at the University of Vermont and has a keen interest in how people negotiate their futures with regard to 21stcentury social and environmental uncertainties. He talks with Eric about how catastrophism and apocalypticism show up in modern film and literature, how they tend to favor individualism over collectivism, and how he stays balanced while immersed in these narratives, among other things.

HCP #29: Questioning Social Narratives, With Layla Abdel-Rahim

Layla AbdelRahim is an anthropologist whose books Wild Children – Domesticated Dreams, and Children’s Literature, Domestication, and Social Foundationactively critique the foundational social narratives that support a human-centered view of the natural world. She talks with Eric about human supremacy, anthropocentrism, decolonizing our minds, and questioning social narratives, among other things.

HCP #27: The Need for Cultural Healing, with Charis Boke

Charis Boke is an herbalist, educator, community organizer and an anthropologist who earned her PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Cornell University. In this episode she and Eric talk about her research on Transition Towns in the northeast US, the need for cultural healing, seeing racism as a cultural sickness, and the impermanence of social institutions, among other things.

HCP #26: On Endings, English, and Citizenship, with Stephen Jenkinson

Stephen Jenkinson is an author, teacher, storyteller, spiritual activist, farmer, and founder of the Orphan Wisdom School. He talks with Eric about the link between the paucity of initiatory experiences and elderhood in the Western world, how grievance is a childish occupation, the risks of becoming lazy with our use of language, the intricacies of sustainability, and the need to reconstitute how we see citizenship, among other things.

HCP #25: Oppression, Isolation, and Holistic Resistance, with Aaron Johnson

Aaron Johnson lives in a self-made 13 x 13 ft earth dome in Southern California, and is a singer, photographer and filmmaker who uses these media, and others, to dismantle racism. He talks with Eric about his counseling programs and his workshops, the challenges that some white people face as they try to get closer to blackness, and the relationship between isolation, toxic masculinity and racism, among other things.

HCP #23: Towards an Ecological Economics, with Robert Costanza

Robert Costanza is the Vice Chancellor’s Chair in Public Policy at the Australian National University, and was among the co-founders of ecological economics. He talks with Eric about the origins of ecological economics, the importance of seeing human beings as part of nature, how to change paradigms and overcome social addictions, and the benefits of payments for ecosystem services, among other things.